Dating with Epilepsy

Many people with epilepsy have fulfilling relationships with a partner. However, epilepsy may affect relationships for some people, and problems with sex are common for both men and women with epilepsy. There are various ways to manage these problems and find support. Seizures are a physical symptom, but having epilepsy can mean far more than the physical impact of seizures, for the person with epilepsy, and their partner. Many people manage seizures well, but seizures can be unpredictable, frightening or shocking, both for the person having seizures and for those who see them. It may be hard to deal with the memory of a seizure, what the person with epilepsy looked like, how you both felt, or with the fear that it might happen again. Some people may not want to be alone with their partner in case they have a seizure, or fear being in the same place where it happened before. If this was in a private place such as in bed or during time alone together, this can put strain on a relationship. It may be hard to face this or talk about it, as you may worry that how you feel might upset your partner.

Epilepsy in Young People

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Try not to worry, most women with epilepsy will have a healthy pregnancy and go on to have a healthy baby. But there is a slightly higher risk of having a baby with a birth defect or developmental problem, so it’s important to get the right support. If you find out you’re pregnant, don’t stop taking your anti-epilepsy medicine until you’ve spoken with your doctor or specialist.

If you’re taking anti-epileptic drugs AEDs and you’re planning to get pregnant, you should continue to use contraception and take your medication until you discuss your plans with your GP or neurologist.

Seizures are a physical symptom, but having epilepsy can mean far more than the physical impact of seizures, for the person with epilepsy, and.

Peter Fox explores your views in a Facebook debate about dating sites. Do they actually work? Is love ever as simple as the greetings card industry would have us believe? I know a couple who, to my mind, are perfect for each other. The kind of couple that make you believe love really exists. Certainly where epilepsy is concerned this can be a very sensitive subject. With the stigma still attached to the condition, many people fear telling potential partners about their seizures. Of course, we live in the digital age.

The questions is, do dating sites really work? There are several dating sites that say they cater specifically for people with disabilities.

Teens with Epilepsy

Published on: April 12, Categories: Epilepsy. Going on a first date can be nerve-wracking under the best of circumstances; epilepsy just adds another twist. We are all human though and there are times however when any of us can forget to take our meds. Make sure you notice if this happens so you can remind them. Consider occasions such as going on holiday or for a weekend away — have they remembered to pack their meds? Keep on track of when their appointments are and write it on the calendar — two heads are better than one.

Though discussing epilepsy with your date is a good idea, its something that you don’t need to do until you feel comfortable talking about it.

On our first date, Gary confided in me about his epilepsy. I didn’t know that he would actually have an episode two months later. As Told To is a recurring segment on xoNecole where real women are given a platform to tell their stories in first-person narrative as told to a writer. It happened out of nowhere—no warning signs, no memos, no bulletins. I had never had an epilpetic friend, family member, or coworker, so no amount of Grey’s Anatomy binge-watching could have ever prepared me for this.

We were at my cousin’s house the night before drinking, playing games, watching TV and just relaxing. It was our first month-aversary together. It got super late at night so rather than going back home to Jersey, we just crashed at my cousin’s house in Jamaica [Queens]. I woke up with a headache because I had overdone it the previous night, and so did my boyfriend Gary. Gary had gotten out of bed to take a shower and the moment he was about to turn around towards the door, he started convulsing.

I immediately screamed, and watched him collapse to the floor. Thankfully, my cousin’s dog’s bed was on the floor to break Gary’s fall and prevent him from hitting his head. I screamed for my cousin and turned Gary onto his side. I remember him saying this on our first date:.

She said: Emily and Dan on dating and epilepsy

Dating is a natural activity, but it does not come naturally to most people. Teens are often uncomfortable or uneasy when they start to date, and having epilepsy can complicate an already complicated social situation. Although it is a good idea for teens to discuss epilepsy with their dates, it is reasonable to wait until the relationship feels comfortable. The person should not be tested.

For example, it is best not to make up “people you know with epilepsy” to see how the other person will react. If the discussion is open and honest, friends will be more willing to ask questions and share their feelings.

I don’t know if it is just me but I’m on a couple of sites and have been for sometime​, as soon as I say I got epilepsy n.

Epilepsy, also known as a seizure disorder, is a disorder of the brain that causes recurrent, unprovoked seizures. Those seizures are caused by surges of electrical activity in the brain, often compared to an electric storm. In most cases, the cause of epilepsy is unknown. Ley Sander, medical director at the Epilepsy Society in the U. In fact, most people with epilepsy experience “partial” or focal seizures. These affect one area of the brain and can result in an aura, physiological reactions, or motor and sensory changes.

Dating someone with epilepsy: what is it like?

This symposium features opportunities to gain insights from ILAE experts, learn more about current best practices, and understand how the pandemic will likely affect medical practice into the future. It is structured to give you maximum opportunities for engagement. It is free of charge and will be offered twice so that you may choose the most convenient date and time.

There is a knowledge gap in epilepsy even amongst medical students. Participants still harbor the traditional African beliefs that epilepsy is a spiritual disease.

This review aims to highlight the historical hallmarks in the development of the concepts of seizures and epilepsy. It begins with a discussion of seizure semiology and terminology, followed by the pathophysiology of seizures. We then discuss the definition of epilepsy, its etiologies, and ultimately classification schemes. Each section starts with our current views and subsequently transports the reader back in time to understand how these views evolved and came to be what they are today. People living as early as in the prehistoric times may have been aware of the existence of seizures, and descriptions and terminology have been provided as early as BC.

While names have been revised and updated through time, the meanings are seemingly unchanged. However, it is clearly evident that we have come a long way in understanding the pathophysiology and etiology of seizures and epilepsy, thus leading to our current classification schemes.

Relationships and sex

Show your flair to reflect your treatment: Example: Keppra: mg; Lamictal mg. If you are a parent, sibling or a child of someone with epilepsy feel free to note it as you wish. To share ideas about the direction of research and available treatment regarding epilepsy, seizure disorders, and SUDEP, and overcome the challenges created by epilepsy through discussion and support.

Faces of Epilepsy – Our Stories. I was just diagnosed with Epilepsy.

Here we provide up to date information and resources to help us do this. If you have important information to share about management of people with epilepsy in.

Here young people talk about their experiences of dating, relationships and sex, and how having epilepsy affected these areas of life. Dating Young people’s experiences of dating and relationships were very positive on the whole. Most we spoke with said that having epilepsy hadn’t had a negative impact on their experiences of dating or going out with people. Quite a few people said that, since their diagnosis, they had become more cautious or careful about who they ask out or develop a relationship with.

Many preferred to get to know people as friends first, before getting involved more seriously. This way, people didn’t need to feel awkward about when and how to tell a new boyfriend or girlfriend about epilepsy because they were already aware of it. A few people said they felt less confident about dating now than before their diagnosis.

Some also talked about how, because of frequent seizures and lack of social networks, it was difficult to meet new people. One woman said epilepsy had knocked her confidence so much she didn’t want to ask anyone out because she feared being rejected. Many people felt that, if their boyfriend or girlfriend couldn’t cope with their epilepsy, then they wouldn’t be the right person for them anyway.

One man said that epilepsy was a part of his life so any girlfriend would just have to ‘take it or leave it’. A couple of people who hadn’t yet dated much, said they were a bit worried how epilepsy might affect their future relationships or finding a partner.

Things Not To Say To Someone With Epilepsy